How do your allergies develop?

How do your allergies develop?

How do our bodies mistake otherwise harmless substances for potential dangers and cause the unpleasant, and sometimes even fatal, symptoms of allergy?
From the mother anxiously watching for signs of wheezing the first time her child eats peanut butter to the retiree’s sudden reaction to shellfish, allergies can strike at any point during our lives.
Allergens, or molecules with the potential to cause allergy, are everywhere in our environment.
When the body mistakes one of these substances as a threat and reacts with an immune response, we develop an allergy.
And what causes the symptoms that many are so familiar with?
This is called a Type 1 immune response, and the cell type at the heart of this process is the regulatory T cell.
When friend becomes foe That being said, in some individuals, the body’s immune cells see the allergen as a threat, and a pro-inflammatory response occurs as a result.
This is called a Type 2 immune response, and a different class of T cell appears on the scene: T helper type 2 cells.
The first exposure to an allergen that results in a Type 2 immune response is called allergic sensitization.
Our bodies can react by developing eczema (atopic dermatitis), hay fever (allergic rhinitis), allergic asthma, food allergies, or anaphylaxis, which is a severe and potentially deadly allergic reaction.

Dr. is In: Combat seasonal allergies

Dr. is In: Combat seasonal allergies

. CORPUS CHRISTI (KIII NEWS) – Almost half of all Americans suffer from seasonal allergies. For some it is a mild runny nose but for others it can trigger severe asthma attacks or other reactions that significantly affect their lives. These reactions are because of the body’s reaction to pollen that is released by trees and or plants.
The body’s reaction is one that is usually to protect us from parasites but in this situation are misguided. Additionally the reaction to the pollen is also much stronger than it would be to a parasite. Genetics and the environment play a role in this. We do not yet have a way of modifying our genetics and so we can change the environment.
This would be akin to moving to a high desert region where there is usually a lower pollen count or moving to a different geographic location that does not have a high pollen count of the specific allergen. Allergic reactions can range from runny noses and itchy eyes to asthma and occasionally to shock.

5 things to know about fall allergies

5 things to know about fall allergies

Fall allergies are coming, be prepared.
Dr. Jeffrey Culp, an allergist with Wilmington Health, said spring allergens include tree and grass pollen while fall sufferers struggle with mold and weeds. A secondary fall allergy can also be dust mites.
But Culp said this will just let in mold spores and ragweed pollen, which will only lead to worsening symptoms. The first rule of dealing with fall allergies is avoidance, he said.
Keep windows and doors closed and run the air conditioning, especially in the car. Change air filters regularly and use a dehumidifier to keep mold spores down.
Avoid drying clothes on an outdoor clothing line and check pollen counts daily either online or in the newspaper.
Decongestant sprays can wear off quickly, allowing nasal swelling to come back worse.

KOLD INVESTIGATES: Hidden allergens could be in your food

KOLD INVESTIGATES: Hidden allergens could be in your food

. While we know reactions to things like peanuts can be serious, there are other potential allergens that aren’t necessarily labeled.
Alison Manhoff loves cooking with her son Hudson. “He was allergic to peanuts and tree nuts,” Manhoff said.
Hudson had an anaphylactic reaction.
The thing is, manufacturers aren’t required to list sesame.
In fact, only the top eight allergens — milk, eggs, fish, shellfish, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat and soybean — have to be listed on labels.
Baker said there are over 100 foods proven to cause allergies, and the reactions can be severe. “We’ve had severe reactions, in some cases even deaths, from sesame allergy,” Baker said. “One of the big problems we have in this country is that you group things and call them natural flavorings,” Baker said.

Why you need to test for allergies (and the easiest assessment you can get)

Why you need to test for allergies (and the easiest assessment you can get)

Manage the symptoms, avoid the allergens, take a pill if you need to, and you’ll be fine.
But allergies are tricky. Yes, they can totally be harmless but they can also be fatal as well. They can hit you right in the gut the least you expect them.
Take my case, for example. I was already 27 years old when I was diagnosed with food allergy.
The center recently launched the Faber Test, a diagnostic test for allergies, which tests for a broad range of allergens. Here’s what I learned about the Faber Test.
Unlike other allergy tests, the Faber test can zero in on a specific ingredient a patient is allergic to.
Anyone can take the test.