Meditation may decrease the risk of heart disease

Meditation may decrease the risk of heart disease

“Overall, studies of meditation suggest a possible benefit on cardiovascular risk, although the overall quality and in some cases quantity of study data is modest,” said the statement, released Thursday.
The committee looked at 57 studies that researched common types of “sitting meditation” and whether the practice had any impact on heart disease.
The group excluded studies of meditation that incorporated physical activity – such as yoga or Tai Chi – because physical activity itself has been proven to help the heart.
But research is more limited on meditation and heart health.
Meditation itself has been around for centuries — at least as early as 5000 B.C.
He said he finds that it helps him to feel calmer and allows him to observe his anxiety without reacting to it.
In addition, 17 percent of all cardiovascular disease patients surveyed expressed interest in participating in a clinical trial of meditation.
Not all views expressed in American Heart Association News stories reflect the official position of the American Heart Association.

Chef gives Cuban classics a healthy twist

Chef gives Cuban classics a healthy twist

“During that time, I was like, ‘This sucks,’” recalled Linares, now the executive chef at his parents’ Cuban restaurant in Somerville, New Jersey.
But those experiences and memories instilled in him a love of food.
The 36-year-old father of two honed his culinary skills when he was a cook in the Marines.
His passion for healthy eating comes from an earlier time in his life.
Linares gained a lot of weight after his parents moved the family to the United States.
Theirs is an experience shared by many U.S. Hispanic and Latino immigrant families, Linares said.
The picadillo recipe, for example, is made with turkey instead of beef.

Parody of 1970s hit reminds people to act fast during stroke

Parody of 1970s hit reminds people to act fast during stroke

A new music video from the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association takes a light-hearted approach to recognizing the symptoms of a serious and life-threatening condition — stroke.
In the video, “Y.M.C.A.” becomes “F.A.S.T.,” a memory aid that stands for face drooping, arm weakness, speech difficulty, and time to call 911.
Stroke affects nearly 800,000 Americans each year and is a leading cause of serious long-term disability.
Lee H. Schwamm, M.D., a professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, said he hopes the video convinces people to react quickly to stroke symptoms.
“Every minute a stroke continues untreated, brain cells are dying. So acting fast is our best weapon against stroke,” he said.
“The song is humorous, but only in an effort to help people learn the symptoms of stroke,” said Schwamm, adding that he hopes the humor ends up saving lives.
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Not all views expressed in American Heart Association News stories reflect the official position of the American Heart Association.

2017 Class of Heart Disease and Stroke Survivors Announced for World Heart Day

2017 Class of Heart Disease and Stroke Survivors Announced for World Heart Day

In observance of the day this year, the American Heart Association, the world’s leading voluntary organization dedicated to building healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke, is honoring 11 women who are sharing their stories to inspire others as part of the 2017 Go Red For Women class of Real Women.
The campaign emphasizes that small changes can make a powerful difference, and encourages people to fuel their heart with a healthy diet, love their heart by not smoking, move their heart by staying active, and know their numbers (blood sugar, blood pressure, total and HDL cholesterol, and body mass index) to manage their risk.
The American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women Real Women represent a sisterhood of survivors who actively, urgently, and passionately participate in the movement to raise awareness of the issues connecting women and heart diseases and stroke.
She now shares her story in her classes to encourage her colleagues and patients to know their numbers, take symptoms seriously and trust their medical providers.
Each woman selected for Go Red For Women’s Real Women class has a unique, personal story about their heart or brain health journey.
Cardiovascular diseases kill about one woman every 80 seconds and about 80% of cardiovascular diseases may be preventable. The American Heart Association, the Go Red Real Women, and the World Heart Federation know that small lifestyle changes can make a powerful difference to our heart health.
Go Red For Women is the American Heart Association’s national movement to end heart disease and stroke in women. Go Red For Women advocates for more research and swifter action for women’s heart health.

Women, doctors need to focus on both heart health and reproductive health, experts say

Women, doctors need to focus on both heart health and reproductive health, experts say

. Nearly one-third of women surveyed reported getting an annual check-up from their ob-gyn. But only 13 percent of women talk about heart health at their ob-gyn visit, according to the national survey of about 1,000 women ages 18-64.
1 health threat.
Those discussions should happen, and they should include long-term health, said panelist Haywood Brown, M.D., president of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.
The key is to improve relationships and communications between ob-gyns and cardiologists, Brown said.