Dr. Crabb Talks Hand Safety with Local Businesses

Dr. Crabb Talks Hand Safety with Local Businesses

COLUMBUS – Local businesses had the chance to learn about hand safety and recovery in the work place, at the Health and Safety Council’s monthly meeting.
Columbus Community Hospital Occupational Health Services Director Danielle Frewing says the meetings are focused on how businesses and companies can remain safe in the work place, while keeping up with the latest regulations and safety tips.
“We’re excited to have Dr. Ian Crabb, from the Columbus Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Clinic, here to talk about hand injuries. You can be as careful as you can in the work place, sometimes hand injuries arise, and he is our expert in how to treat those different types of hand injuries, such as; trigger finger, de quervain syndrome, and carpal tunnel just to name a few,” says Frewing.
Dr. Crabb says it is important to know how to prevent and recover from these injuries, because the hands are such as vital part of day to day work for most people.
“A large portion of our brain is devoted to the parts that operate the hand, and we take it for granted, and when things go wrong with it, it can really be a major problem. So the goal is to learn about prevention, and how to be safer in the workplace,” says Crabb.

Cost of Living: Starting a business appealing for more Hoosiers

Cost of Living: Starting a business appealing for more Hoosiers

Then, test your idea, gather feedback and see if the idea will really work.
It’s always going to take three times longer and it’s going to cost three times as much as you think in the beginning,” said Becker. “Now is exactly the perfect time to start a business,” said Kavensky.
Experts said you need to find out what your liability and tax issues might be when setting up a company.
Does the product work?
Find an investor who shares your passion, someone you believe you can work with.
It’s going to take some time before you make a profit.

National Disability Employment Awareness Month celebrates employees and employers alike

National Disability Employment Awareness Month celebrates employees and employers alike

ELIZABETH, NJ–October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month, an annual celebration of both people with disabilities who work and those businesses and organization that employ them.
Locally, the nonprofit Community Access Unlimited (CAU) has a robust program for preparing its members with disabilities for employment, then connecting them with businesses looking to employ them, according to Joanne Oppelt, assistant executive director of business development at the agency.
CAU operates an Employment and Day Habilitation Services Department that assists those members who wish to work, comprising pre-placement services, including training in interviewing skills, work dress and on-the-job behavior; liaison support; on-the-job coaching; and follow-up to ensure both the member and the employer are happy, according to Oppelt.
CAU member Sharon Mohry has been employed at ShopRite for more than 20 years, working six hours a day one or two days a week. “I like the people,” she said.
In addition to ShopRite and Witsons, businesses employing CAU members include Sam’s Club, Target, Marshall’s, the Swan Motel, the Humane Society and CAU itself (8 percent of CAU’s 1,200 employees are people with disabilities).
Research shows there are a number of significant benefits for businesses employing people with disabilities.
Studies show employees with disabilities are absent less frequently than those without disabilities and are more likely to stay at their job, according to Oppelt.
Businesses seeking to learn more about the benefits of hiring people with disabilities and how to go about doing so should visit the Employee Assistance and Resource Network on Disability Inclusion at www.askearn.org.
CAU is a statewide Elizabeth-based nonprofit providing support programs and services to adults with disabilities as well as youth served under the Department of Children and Families (DCF) to enable them to live independently in the community, providing supports in areas including housing, vocational skills and life-skills training, education, advocacy and recreation.

The Problem With Separating ‘Business’ and ‘Personal’ as a Chronically Ill Entrepreneur

The Problem With Separating ‘Business’ and ‘Personal’ as a Chronically Ill Entrepreneur

For me, living with a chronic illness and trying to run a business, everything feels personal.
Your business becomes you and you become your business.
Like any other business owner, when you go down the ship goes down too, but for me, as a chronic illness patient, everything is a little more hectic and seemingly always personal.
I don’t want to make excuses, I don’t even want people to maybe not want a refund because of delayed sickness shipping; but I do wish I had a bit more understanding from everyone.
It’s like this: I have an illness I didn’t ask for that has changed my life in good ways and bad. I am in business for myself.
Continue having setbacks and never mention my illness and be seen as unprofessional?
For me, business is personal. I am so over beating myself up and feeling like I shouldn’t be personal with my customers.
Again at 5 percent and then wondering why it’s not working.

What you need to know about workers’ compensation

What you need to know about workers’ compensation

Workers’ compensation insurance is compulsory for business owners in all states and territories.
Employers are responsible for taking reasonable steps to ensure that the workplace is a safe working environment, which extends to events where employers are technically off the clock, such as work Christmas parties.
Uninsured employers may still be able to claim for workers’ compensation benefits for staff in case of injury or illness, so check with your local authority.
Each state and territory has independent regulators and administrators in place to run workers’ compensation, so make sure you become familiar with your local authorities.
Response: If a safety incident takes place, you must take steps to remove the hazard that caused it, and implement changes to stop it from happening again.
Managing hazards: An effective risk and hazard management methodology will allow you to identify hazards that pose a risk to your workers and resolve them before they cause injury or illness.
Recovery: Where a worker has been injured, the employer has responsibilities to put in place a rehabilitation management system for workplace injury or illness.