DR ELLIE CANNON: How to cut your risk of bowel cancer and what you need to eat to beat it

DR ELLIE CANNON: How to cut your risk of bowel cancer and what you need to eat to beat it

That’s why it is important to get anything you feel is not quite right for you checked out.
The World Health Organisation has warned that 50g of processed meat a day – just one sausage – increases the chance of developing bowel cancer by 18 per cent.
According to Cancer Research UK, the less alcohol you drink, the lower your risk of cancer.
The solution: It is important to say that not everyone who drinks alcohol will get cancer – of course not – but it is a risk and we have to weigh up that risk.
Exercise is also linked to a lower risk of polyps developing in the bowel.
He says: ‘I used to love bacon – and as a 6ft-tall former rugby player, I’d eat meat most days.
‘Research into genes for bowel cancer is at an early stage, so they don’t know how significant these anomalies are, but she’s now been told to have a colonoscopy every year, rather than every five years as she did before.

Majority of recent cancer drugs approved for use in UK show no survival benefits, study finds

Majority of recent cancer drugs approved for use in UK show no survival benefits, study finds

The majority of cancer drugs approved for use in the UK in recent years are not proven to extend life, research has found.
The study published in the BMJ examined 48 medications approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) to treat 68 separate cancers from 2009 to 2013.
It found that in two thirds of cases, drugs came into the market without clear evdience they could improve survival.
Dr Deborah Cohen, associate editor at The BMJ, said: “The fact so many of the new drugs on the market lack good evidence that they improve patient outcomes puts governments in a difficult position when it comes to deciding which treatments to fund. “But regulatory sanctioning of a comparator that lacks robust evidence of efficacy means the cycle of weak evidence and uncertainty continues.” “While the European Medicines Agency (EMA) decides which new drugs are safe to be sold in Europe, it’s national bodies like Nice (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) that decide which drugs should be made available to patients. “Nice makes these decisions based on the clinical effectiveness and the cost of a drug to determine whether it will bring value to patients and the NHS.

Julia Louis-Dreyfus and her son thank supporters after her cancer diagnosis

Julia Louis-Dreyfus and her son thank supporters after her cancer diagnosis

Julia Louis-Dreyfus and her family shared sentimental appreciation for the outpouring of public support — and for each other — after the “Veep” star revealed her breast cancer diagnosis this past week.
I couldn’t be more thankful for the outpouring of support for my mom yesterday. Here’s a picture of us taken last year.
“Here’s a picture of us taken last year.
I’m thankful, too.
The Northwestern men’s basketball team tweeted at their teammate’s mom: “You’ve been there for us.

Deep Run native Patsy Spear’s personal battle with cancer

Deep Run native Patsy Spear’s personal battle with cancer

For example, if breast cancer spreads to the lungs, it is still breast cancer, not lung cancer.
Chemotherapy: treatment with drugs to kill cancer cells. Chemo is used in addition to surgery or radiation to treat cancer when it has spread, when it has come back, or when there is a strong chance that it could come back.
Mammogram: and x-ray of the breast; a way to find breast cancers that cannot be felt.
Recurrence: cancer that has come back after treatment.
Moving past difficult times is just another chapter of her experience. One side of her body is nearly numb and there’s a port on the side of her chest.
The second time around they had more fun with it but the third time she didn’t let them know at all, “it was just a thing,” she said.
Her team consists of doctors, medicine, family, friends and faith.

Former Red Wings broadcaster Dave Strader dies after cancer battle

Former Red Wings broadcaster Dave Strader dies after cancer battle

DETROIT (WXYZ) — Former Detroit Red Wings broadcaster Dave Strader died on Sunday after battling cancer.
He was 62 years old.
Strader was diagnosed with cholangiocarcinoma, a rare form of bile duct cancer, last year.
He first served as a broadcaster for the Red Wings’ American Hockey League affiliate in Adirondack from 1979 to 1985 before spending the next 11 seasons handling television play-by-play for Detroit.
Strader began working national hockey broadcasts in 1996 for ESPN, and later ABC and FOX.
Strader spent the last two seasons handling the play-by-play duties for the Dallas Stars, continuing to call games both locally and nationally following his cancer diagnosis in June 2016. “The loss of Dave will certainly be felt throughout the hockey community,” Red Wings general manager Ken Holland said in a release. “He was one of the most iconic play-by-play announcers of his time and a true gentleman. He was a devoted husband and father, and his presence will be sorely missed in arenas throughout the league.”