Study shows rise in sudden, severe food allergies among adults

Study shows rise in sudden, severe food allergies among adults

New York, N.Y. (NBC) – Imagine you are out to dinner, enjoying your favorite dish, and then suddenly–you have trouble breathing.
A new study finds that severe allergic reactions to food in adults have gone up sharply, more than 300% in the last decade.
But they say it the reactions are occurring quickly and without any warning.
Food allergies are different than food intolerance and the reaction to a food allergy in an adult can be much more severe than the reaction in a child.
Allergist Dr. Jonathan Hemler explained, “It’s very concerning so yeah we don’t really have a good explanation as to why this is happening but the other thing that we found is that going along with the increase in food allergy we’re also seeing more severe anaphylaxis events happening where adults have to go to the emergency room to get treatment for a severe life threatening allergic reaction which is very concerning.
“We really don’t have a way to predict and know what happens when you eat a food. in fact, when someone has been diagnosed with a food allergy often tell them that even if you just had a couple of hives the first time you ate the food it could be full blown anaphylactic shock the next time.
She’ll also tell you what types of food adults are most likely to become allergic to suddenly.

How do your allergies develop?

How do your allergies develop?

How do our bodies mistake otherwise harmless substances for potential dangers and cause the unpleasant, and sometimes even fatal, symptoms of allergy?
From the mother anxiously watching for signs of wheezing the first time her child eats peanut butter to the retiree’s sudden reaction to shellfish, allergies can strike at any point during our lives.
Allergens, or molecules with the potential to cause allergy, are everywhere in our environment.
When the body mistakes one of these substances as a threat and reacts with an immune response, we develop an allergy.
And what causes the symptoms that many are so familiar with?
This is called a Type 1 immune response, and the cell type at the heart of this process is the regulatory T cell.
When friend becomes foe That being said, in some individuals, the body’s immune cells see the allergen as a threat, and a pro-inflammatory response occurs as a result.
This is called a Type 2 immune response, and a different class of T cell appears on the scene: T helper type 2 cells.
The first exposure to an allergen that results in a Type 2 immune response is called allergic sensitization.
Our bodies can react by developing eczema (atopic dermatitis), hay fever (allergic rhinitis), allergic asthma, food allergies, or anaphylaxis, which is a severe and potentially deadly allergic reaction.

SafeEats Food Allergy Club guides students

SafeEats Food Allergy Club guides students

. SafeEats is the new and improved version of the Food Allergy Support Group, as older students may remember it. Both women said they remembered how difficult eating on campus was for them during their first years on campus and how much the situation has improved for new students, especially since all dining staff were given allergy training this past summer.
“The main goal is to provide a supportive, safe and healthy environment for students on campus with food allergies, intolerances and sensitivities,” Chadwick said.
Until the club’s first meeting, officers will be brainstorming meeting ideas and planning club events.
The NC State director of nutrition and wellness, Lisa Eberhart, oversees SafeEats as their faculty advisor and occasionally makes a guest lecture appearance at meetings.
“As a dining diplomat I spoke to freshmen this summer during orientation about where to eat on campus and how to live without a kitchen,” Chadwick said.

Peanut allergy risk SLASHED if parents do THIS simple trick during infancy

Peanut allergy risk SLASHED if parents do THIS simple trick during infancy

Food allergies are when the body’s immune system reacts unusually when eating particular items, and having an aversion to peanuts is one of the most common types.
Sufferers risk a runny nose, skin reactions, itching, digestive problems, tightening of the throat, and shortness of breath, if they consume the food.
However, researchers have discovered that peanut allergies could be prevented if mothers consumed them during breastfeeding.
We found that the introduction of peanuts before 12 months of age was associated with a reduced risk of peanut sensitisation by school age.
The Canadian study found that exposing children to them early in life could stop them suffering.
“We found that the introduction of peanuts before 12 months of age was associated with a reduced risk of peanut sensitisation by school age, particularly among children whose mothers consumed peanuts while breastfeeding,” said Dr Tracey Pitt, lead study author from the Humber River Hospital in Ontario.
The idea is that this will desensitise their immune system.
Allergy rates are on the rise in the UK, with one in every hundred people thought to suffer from a peanut allergy.
This is because they grow underground, as opposed to on trees like almonds.

Keeping food allergies in check at school

Keeping food allergies in check at school

One in 13 children in the United States — nearly 6 million in total — have food allergies, with 30 percent of those children being allergic to more than one food. Allergic reactions can range from itching and nausea to anaphylaxis, a life-threatening condition.
I also recommend enlisting an allergist to provide additional guidance. The Food Allergy Center at Hasbro Children’s Hospital is a great resource for local families looking for a care plan or to help diagnose potential allergies.
Make an appointment with your child’s teachers, principals, instructors, and school nurses to discuss accommodations needed for your child’s safety and inclusion, and to review your child’s emergency care plan.
Of course, a child’s lifelong success in living with food allergies begins with their decisions. It’s critical to educate your child about their condition. Also, your child needs to identify early allergic symptoms and how to best seek immediate help.