“Clean Up”, Regulator Tells Waste And Recycling Industry

“Clean Up”, Regulator Tells Waste And Recycling Industry

Companies and people working in the waste and recycling industry are being told they must pay closer attention to how they manage workplace risk or face serious penalties, by the Health and Safety Executive.
The Health and Safety Executive’s (HSE) programme of proactive inspections will review health and safety standards in waste and recycling businesses across the country, and the industry is being warned that unannounced inspections will begin next week.
The visits come as HSE releases its sector plans which pinpoint the waste and recycling industry as a priority sector.
The waste and recycling sector, which is made up of around 120,000 workers, has a statistically higher rate of workplace injury and work-related ill health than other sectors and workers in this industry are more likely to suffer work-related illness than any other sector.
In the five years to 2016/17 there were 39 fatalities to workers and 11 members of the public were killed as a result of work activity in the sector.
The inspections will ensure measures are being taken by those responsible to protect workers and employers against risk and injury and HSE will not hesitate to use enforcement to bring about improvements.
HSE’s head of waste and recycling Rick Brunt, said: “The waste and recycling industry continues to have one of the poorest health and safety records. This inspection initiative will look at certain activities to ensure effective management and control of risk.

Dr. Crabb Talks Hand Safety with Local Businesses

Dr. Crabb Talks Hand Safety with Local Businesses

COLUMBUS – Local businesses had the chance to learn about hand safety and recovery in the work place, at the Health and Safety Council’s monthly meeting.
Columbus Community Hospital Occupational Health Services Director Danielle Frewing says the meetings are focused on how businesses and companies can remain safe in the work place, while keeping up with the latest regulations and safety tips.
“We’re excited to have Dr. Ian Crabb, from the Columbus Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Clinic, here to talk about hand injuries. You can be as careful as you can in the work place, sometimes hand injuries arise, and he is our expert in how to treat those different types of hand injuries, such as; trigger finger, de quervain syndrome, and carpal tunnel just to name a few,” says Frewing.
Dr. Crabb says it is important to know how to prevent and recover from these injuries, because the hands are such as vital part of day to day work for most people.
“A large portion of our brain is devoted to the parts that operate the hand, and we take it for granted, and when things go wrong with it, it can really be a major problem. So the goal is to learn about prevention, and how to be safer in the workplace,” says Crabb.

Farming tops list of NI’s most dangerous industries

Farming tops list of NI’s most dangerous industries

Farming continues to be Northern Ireland’s most dangerous industry, according to figures released by the Health and Safety Executive (HSENI).
HSENI last week published its latest Annual Report which shows an increase in the number of workplace fatalities but a significant decrease in injuries, with major injuries down 13% on last year and all reportable injuries down 12%.
Farm related fatalities remained the same with six deaths and there were three construction fatalities in 2016-17 compared to two in the previous year.
We simply must all continue to work as hard as we can to stop these often easily preventable tragedies.
“Sadly farming remains Northern Ireland’s most dangerous industry with another six families devastated in 2016/17.
However, what can be more frightening is the number of people seriously injured each year at work. Especially given that the difference between a major, life-changing, injury and a fatality can be just a few seconds or inches.
During 2016-17 HSENI, in conjunction with local councils, raised the issue of ‘safe skin’.

Yukon Workers’ Compensation Health and Safety Board to increase rates in 2018

Yukon Workers’ Compensation Health and Safety Board to increase rates in 2018

The Yukon Workers’ Compensation Health and Safety Board will increase its assessment rates for most businesses in 2018, the board said in a press release Oct. 12.
Employers in industries such as building demolition, bricklaying and masonry will see the largest increase at 10.3 per cent (which translates to $5.70 per every $100 of payroll, up from $5.17 in 2017). Employers in industries like road making and electrical contracting, come in second with a 9.8 per cent increase ($3.24 in 2018, up from $2.95 in 2017).
Employers from other groups can expect to see a rate increase ranging between 0.3 to 6.2 per cent.
The sole group to buck the trend is the resources and transportation category which includes placer mining, exploration, reclamation and drilling water wells, which will see a 2.7 per cent decrease in rates next year ($4.66 in 2018 compared to $4.79 in 2017).
The YWCHSB press release said that even with the increases, most employers will still be paying less than they did from 2009 to 2015, and that rates are still “artificially low” thanks to a surplus that allows rates to be subsidized.
“When employers pay rates that reflect the actual costs of caring for injured workers, it helps them recognize the value of preventing injuries and getting workers back on the job as quickly and safely as possible following an injury,” board chair Mark Pike said in the release.
Rate increases for some groups are also the result of an increase in claims, YWCHSB President and CEO Kurt Dieckmann said in the press release.
“Employers may not be able to control rate subsidies, but they have direct control over how safe their workplaces are, and that’s a much more effective way to keep rates low,” Dieckmann said.

Why agriculture is the nation’s most dangerous workplace

Why agriculture is the nation’s most dangerous workplace

A TOTAL of 44 workers from the agriculture, forestry and fishing sector died on the job in 2016, maintaining the agriculture sector’s dubious title of being the nation’s most dangerous workplace.
Primary Industries Health and Safety Partnership (PIHSP) chairman Patrick Murphy said it was a figure the industry needs to address as a matter of priority.
“This makes the fatality rate (per 100,000 workers) of men and women working in the sector the highest of any other industry in Australia,” Mr Murphy said.
Mr Murphy said the direct and indirect costs of work-related illnesses, injuries and deaths are significant.
“The Safe Work Australia report estimates that a total of $61.8 billion was lost in 2012-13,” he said.
“Further to that, overall statistics for 2015-16 show the average amount of time lost due to injury is 5.2 weeks.
The partnership is funded by AgriFutures Australia, Grains Research and Development Corporation, Australian Meat Processor Association, Meat and Livestock Australia and the Cotton Research and Development Corporation.