Dabbing Cannabis Oil May Expose You To Cancer-Causing Toxins

Dabbing Cannabis Oil May Expose You To Cancer-Causing Toxins

A study published this month in the American Chemical Society’s ACS Omega found that a method of using cannabis known as dabbing may expose users to elevated toxin levels as compared to other methods.
As the study noted, the principal product used in dabbing is butane hash oil (BHO), which is extracted from cannabis by adding and removing butane, and can resultingly have an active THC content of up to 90%–easily several times the amount you might find in regular dispensary-quality cannabis flower, a.k.a bud.
The team also explained, “Different nuances in its processing can lead to slightly different consistencies, which take on terms such as shatter, budder, crumble, pull-and-snap, wax, and so on.”
In order to release the vapor and active chemicals therein, users commonly use either a self-heating electronic nail or, in the case of simple metal nails, apply heat with a handheld blowtorch or similar tool.
In this case, as with previous research on e-cigarettes by the study’s senior author, Robert Strongin, Ph.D., it seems the higher the temperature that a substance’s flavoring terpenes are subjected to, the more carcinogens, toxins, and potential irritants are produced–meaning the (literally) hot art of dabbing could put users at greater risk than other methods.
In the researchers’ simulations, concentrates that were subjected to higher heat seemed to create vapor containing higher levels of methacrolein (MC), a “noxious irritant” related to the powerful pulmonary irritant acrolein, and benzene, a known carcinogen that’s been studied for years.
“The difficulty users find in controlling the nail temperature put[s] users at risk of exposing themselves to not only methacrolein but also benzene.” “Additionally, the heavy focus on terpenes as additives seen as of late in the cannabis industry is of great concern due to the oxidative liability of these compounds when heated.” “Given the widespread legalization of marijuana in the U.S., it is imperative to study the full toxicology of its consumption to guide future policy,” he said.

Marijuana legalisation: Construction industry worried

Marijuana legalisation: Construction industry worried

The province introduced plans and rules regarding the sale and distribution for recreational marijuana use in September including prohibition on use in public spaces and the workplace.
Quoted by the CBC at a Newfoundland and Labrador construction industry conference this year, Dan Demers, who works at CannAmm Occupational Testing Services said, “Marijuana and dangerous activities, safety-sensitive duties, can’t mix”.
This is somebody using a legal substance that they don’t have to tell us they’re on.”.
He adds, ““The general public is at a risk because our sites are dangerous and we are working in the middle of high population areas. We don’t want people controlling heavy machinery who are impaired”.
In Canada the Toronto Transit Commission obtained a court ruling overturning the workers union objections and instituted random drug and alcohol testing.

Is Medical Marijuana Causing More Fatal Crashes?

Is Medical Marijuana Causing More Fatal Crashes?

Medical marijuana’s role in fatal auto accidents is a subject that’s rarely addressed by those who support full legalization of cannabis.
Police agencies and medical professionals usually refer to it as driving under the influence or operating a vehicle while intoxicated.
The NBC News story quotes researchers at Columbia University, who looked at toxicology reports on over 23,000 dead drivers in six states were medical marijuana was legal.
But alcohol was the most common mind-altering substance detected, appearing in the blood of nearly 40 percent of the drivers who died in 2010.
A second study at Columbia found that states with medical marijuana laws had an 11 percent decrease in traffic fatalities.
Marijuana, like opiates and alcohol, should never be consumed by someone intending to drive.
But cannabis is not always the “magic bullet” when it comes to pain relief, and not all pain patients support it.
I tried CBD medication for three weeks and it did nothing for my pain.
CBD can also show up in toxicology reports and will reflect on the driver if they’re involved in an accident.

Cancer-Causing Compounds Found in Cannabis Oil

Since marijuana can be consumed through a variety of methods—e.g., eating, smoking, or vaporizing—it is important to understand if and how drug delivery methods affect users. With that in mind, a recent study from investigators at Portland State University found benzene and other potentially cancer-causing chemicals in the vapor produced by butane hash oil, a cannabis extract.
Findings from the new study—published recently in ACS Omega in an article entitled “Toxicant Formation in Dabbing: The Terpene Story”—raises health concerns about dabbing, or vaporizing hash oil—a practice that is growing in popularity, especially in states that have legalized medical or recreational marijuana. Dabbing is already controversial.
Dr. Strongin and his colleagues analyzed the chemical profile of terpenes—the fragrant oils in marijuana and other plants—by vaporizing them in much the same way as a user would vaporize hash oil.
“The practice of ‘dabbing’ with butane hash oil has emerged with great popularity in states that have legalized cannabis,” the authors wrote.
Methacrolein, benzene, and several other products of concern to human health were formed under the conditions that simulated real-world dabbing.
It also produced high levels of methacrolein, a chemical similar to acrolein, another carcinogen.

Delaware panel weighs health, safety issues of legalized pot

Delaware panel weighs health, safety issues of legalized pot

As Delaware lawmakers consider legalizing recreational marijuana they should take a go-slow approach and address a wide range of health and safety concerns, members of a special task force were told Wednesday. “Keep it simple.
Tim Holly, an attorney who co-chairs the chamber’s employer advocacy and education committee, also said the terms “under the influence” and “impaired” need to be clearly defined by statute before any legalization scheme is implemented. He also said employers should not be required to pay unemployment benefits for workers who are dismissed for marijuana use.
Meanwhile, Kim Robbins, representing the Delaware Pharmacist Society, warned that marijuana can react negatively with several types of prescription medications, including antibiotics, diabetes medicines, and drugs used to control cholesterol levels.
She suggested that any marijuana dispensary have a pharmacist on site to serve in a consulting role. “Given that this is a new market, we feel it’s better to start simple,” he said. “If things go well, you can expand later.”
That leaves the possibility that Delaware could be the first state to implement legalization through the legislative process.
A legalization bill introduced by Rep. Helene Keeley, D-Wilmington, stalled in the legislature earlier this year, prompting her to introduce a resolution establishing the task force, which she co-chairs.