I finally got to know my mother after her mental illness diagnosis

I finally got to know my mother after her mental illness diagnosis

The older I got, the closer I became to my dad.
I was a rambunctious teenager, always wanting to get out, explore, and press the limits.
My mom wanted pristine perfection, or as close to that as she could get.
This was the first time I looked back on the fragmented pieces of my family’s story with both pain and gratitude.
Visits with her childhood best friends became stories about the young woman my mom was before she was my mother.
I learned about my mom’s quirky, silly personality, about her opinionated debates on practically any topic.
I learned she even failed a class in college once.
I learned about the history of mental illness in our family.
Perhaps she felt the need have it all together to make up for not having it all together in years past.
If you only let me see the authentic you, the imperfect you, it’d only make me love you more.

Week’s events fight stigma, raise awareness about mental illness

Week’s events fight stigma, raise awareness about mental illness

This year, NAMI Yolo has chosen the theme “Home, Work and Recovery” to recognize the roles of safe, pleasant homes and meaningful work in successful recoveries from mental health challenges.
Each year, NAMI fights stigma, provides support, educates the public and advocates for equal care.
Launching the week’s programs at the rally, NAMI will recognize Rodriguez and Gustafson, both of whom are widely respected for their dedicated work in supportive housing and employment.
Rodriguez, the supportive housing honoree, operates Pine Tree Gardens East House, a Turning Point Community Program founded by pioneering mental health services advocate Pat Williams.
Martin’s is grateful to welcome the whole community to this interfaith gathering that supports and shows love and care to those who live with mental illness and face special challenges in their lives,” she says.
“In Our Own Voice” presents first-hand, compelling personal stories of challenge, hope and successful recovery with the goal of combatting stigma. It seeks to reach those who can hire and rent homes to people living with mental illness as well as to introduce local merchants to customers who spend money in their businesses.
They live their life.

Bernita Croslan Ministries takes a serious approach to mental illness

Bernita Croslan Ministries takes a serious approach to mental illness

Also a co-pastor Restored Life Bible Church, here Croslan shares why she became an entrepreneur, her perspective on mental illness and the church’s role.
My inspiration came from watching how women recovered from the encounters from my conference The Recovery Room.
Tell us about your women’s conference.
If they desire to ask questions, we keep a open microphone. Often times in the conference women are usually embracing one another with deep compassion because of the loving atmosphere.
I have experienced countless women who now have changed many things in their lives. Some women have open their hearts and confessed things that caused years of pain.
African Americans should address mental illness more now than ever. I have seen where many times Black churches or believers shy away from things that seem to cause embarrassment.
My desire is to see the Recovery Room grow beyond the walls of two or three cities, but worldwide.

Drowning, learning to cope with mental illness

Drowning, learning to cope with mental illness

Brothers and sisters, mothers and fathers, quarrel and rebel.
One thing is obvious, and in Cassie’s situation, it involves her trying to cope with her mother’s mental illness. It isn’t until years pass when she discovers that her mother’s unpredictable nature — her fondness for Cassie’s brother, Matthew, her cruelty in making Cassie feel invisible, unworthy, fat and ugly, her wish for Cassie to be the daughter she has always wanted and her occasionally strange complimentary behavior toward Cassie — is rooted in her mother’s own background.
Cassie’s mother also was abused by her parents.
At first, naturally, she is sad, hoping her mother will come visit.
Cassie tries to have a relationship with her father, but at times he is distant and mostly chooses to go along with whatever Cassie’s mother wants.
As Cassie grows accustomed to her ‘second family’ at the hospital and makes a few friends, she studies and earns enough credits to attend college after her release. Being inside a mental hospital, then stepping out into the world has been quite an adjustment for the 18-year-old. Cassie’s education is paid for, and maybe, just maybe, Cassie thinks with barely a high hope that this is a sign of her mother’s love.

Community Missions, NFMMC announce annual Interfaith Community Prayer Service for Mental Illness Recovery & Understanding

Community Missions, NFMMC announce annual Interfaith Community Prayer Service for Mental Illness Recovery & Understanding

. Event organizers said area leaders from various faith traditions will join mental health consumers, including those who participate in programs provided by Community Missions, their families and community members, to seek guidance and help in replacing misinformation, blame, fear and prejudice with truth and life in order to offer hope to those touched by mental illness.
One in five adults experience mental illness problems every year, and 50 percent of chronic mental illness begins by age 14. “We wanted to have as many people as possible participate in presenting the service,” Breese said. “This was a fun way for that to happen, and the fountain will help set a peace-filled tone in the sanctuary.”
For more information, contact Mark Breese at 716-285-3403, ext.