Man arrested for attacking officer before related shooting

Man arrested for attacking officer before related shooting

Two weeks after his injury in an officer-involved shooting, the man charged with attacking the officer before being shot has been arrested and handed a no-contact order.
Donald Joseph Miller, 51, is charged with felony counts of robbery with serious bodily injury and simple assault on a peace officer related to his alleged attack on a Bismarck police officer on Oct. 15 at the Bismarck Motor Motel.
He was arrested Friday afternoon and is held at the Burleigh-Morton County Detention Center, pending $150,000 cash bond. “It is our policy not to release the name of an officer involved in a shooting until the investigation is complete,” Sgt.
Mark Buschena said, “the same way we don’t release any other person’s name in a case until that investigation is complete and that person is either charged, or the case is closed and no charges are brought, in which case the name becomes releasable.”
Furthermore, the officer has invoked his victim rights under Marsy’s Law, Buschena added, “so we won’t be releasing his name.”
The Bismarck Tribune was able to identify the officer as Justin Antonovich through Miller’s no-contact order and a current roster of licensed North Dakota peace officers which indicates Antonovich’s employment with Bismarck Police.
Both men were taken to a hospital, where the officer was treated for eye and face injuries and later released.
Miller required surgery for his gunshot wound. “He can come back to work but will not be performing field duties until the investigation and findings are complete,” he said.

Former Southold officers on disability challenge town’s decision

Former Southold officers on disability challenge town’s decision

On Sept. 13, they each filed an Article 78 proceeding against the town, the police department and the police chief in Suffolk County Supreme Court.
Both Mr. Hunstein and Mr. Wysocki seek a court judgment that the termination of their employment was “in violation of lawful procedure, arbitrary and capricious, not based on substantial evidence, and abuse of discretion and/or affected by error of law,” according to the notices of claim.
They also seek reinstatement of “all applicable forfeited compensation and other benefits,” including health insurance and pension contributions, according to court documents.
Mr. Hunstein was injured in June 2012 and had not returned to work since, according to court documents. In June 2014, both were deemed unfit to perform their full duties as police officers, according to the notices of claim.
That charge was made under town law, section 155, and Civil Service Law Section 75.
Mr. Hunstein and Mr. Wysocki argue they can’t be fired for absences due to work-related disability under either of those sections and that Civil Service Law Section 71 ”provides certain reinstatement rights to employees so removed” that are not available under those provisions.
The former officers were the subjects of separate Section 75 hearings in February 2017 and were found “guilty” of being unable to perform their duties, according to the town resolutions.

Maryland union calls for more correctional officers

Maryland union calls for more correctional officers

CUMBERLAND — Members of the union representing correctional officers from across the state held a rally Saturday in Cumberland asking for more officers and better working conditions.
The supporters said dangerous working conditions are plaguing the correctional facilities.
[Larry] Hogan has ignored repeated calls, by state employees and members of the community, about the horrible public health and safety issues facing citizens in Western Maryland.” Jason Daddysman, a correctional sergeant at the Western Correctional Institute in Cresaptown, said the shortage of staff is continuing to negatively impact the work environment.
We’ve lost scores of correctional officers to early retirement and work-related injuries, and more will leave our ranks this year.” Daddysman said corrections is “underfunded, overworked and understaffed.” “Our correctional professionals are not being valued or respected and are leaving,” said Daddysman.
“We’ve been told there is no shortage.
Hogan immediately responded by having our budget cut for the remainder of this year, ensuring no staff will be hired.” Moran said on Saturday that Hogan had called the union advocates “political operatives.” “Gov.
It is unfair and unnecessary and insulting to the people who put their life on the line every day.” Jeff Grabenstein, a correctional officer at the North Branch Correctional Institute and president of AFSCME Local 898, said the state is playing a “dangerous game of chess with peoples’ lives.” “At the end of 2016, the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services had reached a 14 percent vacancy rating,” said Grabenstein.
“The department increased hiring standards but has not increased correction officers’ pay.
In 2016, a 14 percent vacancy rate will lead to over $80 million in overtime expenditures.” Kim Dewey, who represented corrections in Delaware, is a 12-year veteran of that state’s corrections department.
Many of the same conditions we have in Delaware you have in Maryland.” Maryland Sen. Roger Manno also spoke at the rally.

Family of critically injured San Francisco bicycle officer asks for ‘good energy and prayers’

Family of critically injured San Francisco bicycle officer asks for ‘good energy and prayers’

Lewin-Tankel, who works out of Tenderloin Station on Eddy Street, was on his bicycle when a suspect in a gun-related case ran him down in a stolen Lexus SUV at about 12:30 p.m. on Turk Street between Franklin Street and Van Ness Avenue, just a few blocks from City Hall, police said.
Johnson was taken into custody about 3:30 p.m. Wednesday on Ellis Street, officials said, before being booked into county jail on suspicion of attempted murder, reckless driving, hit and run, resisting arrest and driving without a license.
According to San Mateo County District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe, Johnson was convicted in that county of misdemeanor petty theft in 1993 and of giving false information to an officer in 2013. Also in 2013, San Francisco prosecutors charged Johnson with robbery, receiving a stolen car, grand theft and evading an officer.
The next year, he was charged in San Francisco with drug possession, driving without a license, disturbing the peace and providing false information to an officer.
A few months after that, Johnson was arrested in San Francisco on suspicion of buying or receiving stolen property and providing false information to an officer.
Wagstaffe said his office also charged Johnson with a prior strike conviction under California’s “three strikes” law that stemmed from a San Francisco case from 1992.
Johnson was released after a few months, because he had already served much of his time prior to sentencing.
He was sentenced to 67 days in county jail.

Officers Armed with New Tool to Combat Mental Illness

Officers Armed with New Tool to Combat Mental Illness

LITTLE ROCK, Ark.- Law enforcement in central Arkansas are now armed with a new tool to fight mental illness.
More than thirty officers and deputies graduated on Friday from the first of five statewide crisis intervention training programs.
The 40-hour course teaches law enforcement to better address the needs and risks of suspects with mental health conditions.
The instructor says the training will help many suspects get the help they truly need. “It won’t be effective at all times, but it will be a new way of being able to handle that so that they will be able to use a better skill, a new skill, and maybe be able to have people not end up in jails or in hospitals,” said Kim Arnold, Executive Director.
The same new law also established alternatives to jail for low-level offenders with mental health issues called Crisis Stabilization Units.