Childhood friends die half a mile apart on the same day from opioid overdoses

Childhood friends die half a mile apart on the same day from opioid overdoses

“The amount of fentanyl in his body was the equivalent of three grains of salt.
It was too late by the time they arrived, his father recalled.
Manning’s mother was at the gym when her husband called her with the news, CNN reported.
Just a few minutes after paramedics were called to Manning’s home, 911 received another call about an unresponsive male – 18-year-old Abraham.
And then I realized there was something really wrong,” his father told CNN. “As soon as I saw him, I knew and I just ran and I just started holding him and I could tell he was cold,” Abraham’s mother added.
CNN reported that both Abraham and Manning began dabbling with drugs at a young age.
She added that her son may have been increasingly interested in drugs following tragic losses in his life early on.
According to CNN, he told his parents at 12 years old he thought he was suffering from depression. “He told us the drugs are what gave him ‘the out’ and made him feel good,” his mother recalled.

The Secret Role of Insurers in Medicare Opioid Policy

The Secret Role of Insurers in Medicare Opioid Policy

And if the insurance industry is making healthcare decisions while being subsidized with billions of taxpayer dollars, Americans have a right to know what’s going on.
“A total of 58 participants across 26 federal, state, public and private organizations, including CMS, attended the event,” is all that an executive summary of the meeting says about the attendees.
Also unmentioned is a recent HFPP policy decision that allows insurers to share information about Medicare beneficiaries.
But the agency is moving ahead with plans for a new monitoring system to identify opioid “overutilizers” — physicians who prescribe high doses, patients who get them, and pharmacies that fill their prescriptions.

PNN Survey Shows Strong Support for CVS Boycott

PNN Survey Shows Strong Support for CVS Boycott

There is widespread support for a boycott against CVS because of its plan to impose strict limits on the supply and dosage of opioid pain medication, according to a PNN survey of over 2,500 pain patients, caretakers and healthcare providers.
CVS will also limit the dose of opioid prescriptions – for both acute and chronic pain — to no more than 90mg morphine equivalent units (MME).
“It is no one’s business how I prescribe but mine and the patient,” one doctor wrote.
I would also encourage others to boycott,” a healthcare provider wrote.
I will never fill another prescription at CVS pharmacy,” one patient wrote.
Many chronic pain patients are worried the 7-day limit on opioids applies to them (it does not) and others believe a pharmacist doesn’t have the legal right to refuse to fill a doctor’s prescription (they do).
“Corporate self-interest is impetus for this policy.

CVS to Limit Opioid Prescriptions

CVS to Limit Opioid Prescriptions

. CVS Health has announced plans to further restrict the filling of opioid prescriptions at its pharmacies by limiting the dose and initial supply of opioid medication to seven days, starting February 1.
The company said it would “give greater weight” to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s opioid prescribing guideline, which discourages doctors from prescribing opioids for chronic pain.
But the new CVS policy actually goes beyond the voluntary recommendations of the CDC guideline, which was only intended for primary care physicians who treat chronic pain.
“We see firsthand the impact of the alarming and rapidly growing epidemic of opioid addiction and misuse,” said Larry Merlo, CEO of CVS Health.
In recent years, the company has been fined hundreds of millions of dollars for violations of the Controlled Substances Act and other transgressions, many of them involving opioid medication.
In 2016, CVS paid a $3.5 million fine to resolve allegations that 50 of its pharmacies in Massachusetts and New Hampshire filled forged opioid prescriptions.
In 2015, CVS paid a $22 million fine after two of its pharmacies in Florida were found to be routinely filling bogus prescriptions for painkillers, including some for customers as far away as Kentucky.

FDA Targets Rogue Online Pharmacies

FDA Targets Rogue Online Pharmacies

The Food and Drug Administration has joined in a crackdown on over 500 online pharmacies that illegally sell potentially dangerous, unapproved versions of prescription drugs, including opioid pain medication, antibiotics and injectable epinephrine products.
Consumers go to these websites believing that they are buying safe and effective medications, but they are being deceived and put at risk,” FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, MD, said in a statement.
Some of the websites sold unapproved versions of multiple prescription opioids directly to U.S. consumers.
One such letter went to the American Pharmacy Group in Silver Spring, Maryland, warning the company about selling an unapproved combination of hydrocodone and acetaminophen in 10/500mg doses.
The FDA asked drug manufacturers in 2011 to limit the strength of acetaminophen in prescription drugs to 325mg because of the risk of severe liver injury.
“There are currently no approved drug applications… for the hydrocodone products that contain 500 mg of acetaminophen offered for sale on your websites,” the FDA letter warned.
John then referred me to a “new” online pharmacy, one that was not on the list of 21 websites the FDA identified as being affiliated with American Pharmacy.
As part of Pangea X, FDA inspectors also screened packages suspected of containing illegal drugs at international mail facilities (IMFs) in Chicago, Miami and New York. “We’ve recently tripled the staff we have in the IMFs to improve our ability to inspect packages that are suspected of containing illegal drugs, and we have doubled the number of cybercrime and port of entry special agents for the Office of Criminal Investigations,” Gottlieb said.