Lights out! Cintas Poll Reveals Worker Concerns during Power Outages

Lights out! Cintas Poll Reveals Worker Concerns during Power Outages

More than a third of U.S. adults do not feel confident in their ability to navigate a building safely following power loss.
Cintas Corp. commissioned a survey among 2,072 U.S. adults ages 18 and older to identify U.S. worker concerns during power outages.
The study found that more than a third (34 percent) would not feel very confident in their ability to navigate the workplace safely.
“The poll results show that people consider lighting critical to their safety when an emergency occurs,” said Taylor Brummel, marketing manager, Cintas Fire Protection.
“The U.S. experiences more power outages than any other developed country in the world, so it’s important for businesses to be prepared.
Whether its severe weather, faulty power grid equipment, a fire or any other issue, emergency lighting can assist in guiding occupants to safety when power fails.” The poll also found that if the lights went out at their place of work, 50 percent of U.S. adults would not feel very confident in their ability to walk up and down stairways safely.
Additionally, 42 percent of employed Americans would not feel very confident in their ability to calmly execute their workplaces’ emergency plan.
“Emergency and exit lighting is often ignored or excluded from life safety programs,” added Brummel.
“However, due to the increasing risk of power outages in the U.S., it is important for building owners to prioritize emergency and exit light maintenance.” Power outages are on the rise and are nearly four times more likely to occur now than in 2000.
The average U.S. power customer loses power for 3.5 hours per year, dramatically exceeding the average compared to countries like Japan whose average customer experiences only six minutes of power loss per year.

Las Vegas Shooting Victims Are Turning To GoFundMe For Help With Medical Bills

Las Vegas Shooting Victims Are Turning To GoFundMe For Help With Medical Bills

Ethan Miller via Getty Images In a nation politically incapable of preventing mass shootings, and where the right to quality affordable health care is not guaranteed, online fundraising sites are filling the gap to help pay for very expensive U.S. medical bills, like in the case of many survivors of the Las Vegas massacre.
About one month after the shootings, in which 59 people died and more than 500 people were injured, dozens have turned to the popular fundraising site GoFundMe to help them pay for things like surgery and rehabilitation.
“We are trying to raise money for his rehabilitation and get him well.
Also, from 2010 to 2016, the popular crowdfunding site GoFundMe has raised $3 billion, with most of it going toward medical and health campaigns.
And research suggests that online crowdfunding is also playing a role in bringing medical bankruptcies down.
Most people who set out to raise money for their medical needs won’t meet their funding goals.
A person’s name could be forever linked to their medical condition, which could negatively affect future employment.
Some people who raise money for themselves have also revealed that it opens up scrutiny for their other financial choices, said Jennifer Kim, a PhD student at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, who specializes in research on online crowdfunding.
In her research, Gonzalez has encountered people who feel more open now that they’ve come forward about their needs, as there is a kind of strength associated with being able to ask for help.
However, the benefits nonetheless cannot obscure the truth at the core of these fundraising campaigns: Americans can’t get basic medical needs met, and tapping one’s social network for cash might sap motivation for other forms of social support.

Paralyzed Veterans of America awards Syracuse University program for leadership in employing veterans with disabilities

Paralyzed Veterans of America awards Syracuse University program for leadership in employing veterans with disabilities

The Institute for Veterans and Military Families, headquartered at Syracuse University, was recently awarded for its leadership in employment of veterans with disabilities.
IVMF officials run programs for veterans and their families across the United States.
“For PVA to recognize the IVMF for its work — particularly related to how we are working to empower and support this generation of military veterans with disabilities through the programs that we run — I think for us it’s a tremendous honor, and it’s a recognition of the good work that we’re doing here,” Haynie said.
“One thing that I think our university should be proud of is, last year alone, about 25,000 military members who were leaving the military, as well as veterans and military spouses and children, went through programs run by this institute,” Haynie said.
Haynie created an entrepreneurship boot camp program for veterans with disabilities when he first started working at SU 10 years ago. Now, that program runs at 10 other college campuses across the country under the direction of the IVMF.
SU created the entrepreneurship program for veterans with disabilities because it is difficult for veterans to transition back to civilian life, said both Haynie and Tracey Shifflett, director of communications and external affairs for PVA.
Moving forward, IVMF officials hope the PVA’s award draws attention so the organization can reach a broader spectrum of veterans and military-related people with disabilities, Haynie said.
“There are over 40,000 veterans service organizations in the country,” said Stephanie Salanger, director of communications for IVMF and SU’s Office of Veteran and Military Affairs.
Haynie added that it is an honor to be awarded by such a well-respected veterans organization.

IOC appoints tenth Research Centre for Prevention of Injury and Protection of Athlete Health

IOC appoints tenth Research Centre for Prevention of Injury and Protection of Athlete Health

The IOC has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the United States Coalition for the Prevention of Illness and Injury in Sport bringing to ten the number of research centres from across the world that have been named as IOC Research Centres for Prevention of Injury and Protection of Athlete Health.
The United States Coalition for the Prevention of Illness and Injury in Sport is a joint research venture between the University of Utah, the Steadman Philippon Research Institute and the United States Olympic Committee’s (USOC) Sports Medicine Division. All members of the Coalition have a proven record of sports medicine education and cutting edge work with elite athletes from a variety of sports, including Paralympic sport.
Protecting athletes’ health and preventing injuries and illnesses in sport are top priorities for the International Olympic Committee (IOC). Since 2009, the IOC, under the leadership of its Medical and Scientific Commission, has supported and partnered with established research centres from around the world which have demonstrated clinical, educational, and research expertise in the fields of sports medicine and elite sports to promote the athletes’ health through the prevention of injury and illness.
The Coalition joins nine research centres from across the world that are already part of this programme.
These centres, which receive financial support from the IOC, have been mandated to research, develop and implement effective preventive and treatment methods for sports-related injuries and illnesses.

Gun injuries reportedly cost the US $46 billion a year in lost work and medical care

Gun injuries reportedly cost the US $46 billion a year in lost work and medical care

“A startling number” of people, 78,000 a year, are treated in U.S. hospitals for firearm injuries, said lead author Dr. Faiz Gani in a phone interview.
The new report in Health Affairs calculates the price tag for firearm injuries: $2.8 billion a year in American hospital charges and $46 billion a year in lost work and medical care.
“There’s a large clinical and financial burden here, and we really need to do something about it,” said Gani, a postdoctoral research fellow at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland.
It inspired laws mandating automobile seat belts and air bags, for example.
“Horrific mass killings receive the most media attention, but as can be seen by the numbers, they only represent a small portion of the total costs – human and medical – of gun injuries in the United States,” said David Hemenway, director of the Harvard Injury Control Research Center in Boston, who was not involved with the study.
Males were nine times more likely than females to be victims of gunshot injuries, and men ages 20 to 24 were at the highest risk, the study found.
Unintentional shootings led to more than one-third of the non-fatal firearm injuries, the authors found.
The so-called Dickey Amendment has since then almost entirely stopped federal funding of firearms research.
In 2012, he and Mark Rosenberg, who directed the CDC when the Dickey Amendment was approved, co-authored a Washington Post editorial calling for scientific research to prevent firearm injuries.