Type 2 diabetes risk four times higher in women with PCOS

Type 2 diabetes risk four times higher in women with PCOS

Polycystic ovary syndrome is a widespread condition among women of reproductive age, and a new study suggests that it may also put these women at a significant risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
Women with PCOS often have insulin resistance, which is a condition wherein the muscles, fat, and liver do not respond properly to the hormone, so the body keeps producing more of it.
But as the authors of the new research report, there are insufficient prospective population-based studies to date that have studied the connection between PCOS and type 2 diabetes.
Katrine Hass Rubin, of the Institute of Clinical Research at the University of Southern Denmark in Odense, is the first study author, and the corresponding author is Dorte Glintborg, Ph.D., of the Department of Endocrinology at the Odense University Hospital.
In total, the study looked at 19,639 premenopausal women who had been diagnosed with PCOS.
Rubin and team adjusted for other potential risk factors for type 2 diabetes, such as age, body mass index (BMI), the use of oral contraceptives, and the number of times the women had given birth.
As Dr. Glintborg summarizes, “In this study, we found that the risk of developing diabetes is four times greater and that diabetes is diagnosed four years earlier in women with PCOS compared to controls.”
Regarding other type 2 diabetes risk factors, PCOS correlated positively with BMI, insulin, glucose, and triglyceride levels, but correlated inversely with the number of births.
The authors point out that BMI and glucose levels are the most reliable predictors of type 2 diabetes in women with PCOS.
Older age, on the other hand, should not be considered a good predictor, given that the women in the current study were diagnosed with diabetes before the age of 40.

Shocking moment cops drag a woman off a Southwest Airlines plane as she complains about her ‘life-threatening allergies’ to a passenger’s support dog

Shocking moment cops drag a woman off a Southwest Airlines plane as she complains about her ‘life-threatening allergies’ to a passenger’s support dog

A woman was removed from a Southwest Airlines flight after she complained about ‘life-threatening allergies’ to a passenger’s support dog.
At the start of the video, the woman apologizes and says that her father is having surgery as the officers mover her forward.
she asks the officers as other passengers are heard telling the woman to leave the plane peacefully.
Eventually, passengers on the plane turned on the officers, yelling at them for pushing the woman forward.
one passenger is heard saying as the cop tries to push the woman down the aisle.
After a few moments, the woman turns around and tells the officers that she’s a professor, but the cops ignore her and move her forward toward the plane’s exit.
Dumas said the woman asked that the pets on board be removed. He said she also asked for an injection for her allergies to be administered after the crew said they couldn’t remove the dogs.
Southwest Airlines was built on Customer Service, and it is always our goal for all Customers to have a positive experience.’
Since April, numerous airlines have been accused of removing passengers aggressively.

A woman with a life-threatening animal allergy was dragged off a flight — here’s what you need to know about flying with pets

A woman with a life-threatening animal allergy was dragged off a flight — here’s what you need to know about flying with pets

If you’re traveling with a service dog or emotional support animal, you may be required to bring documentation.
If you have a pet allergy, your best bet is to call your airline to try to sit as far away from any service animals as possible.
The woman in the video complained that she had a life-threatening pet allergy after she was seated near two dogs, one of which was a therapy animal.
After a brief altercation, law enforcement became involved and Daulatzai was removed from the plane.
If you’re traveling with a service animal: you are not required by carriers to produce documentation identifying the dog’s credentials.
However, they said they will try to seat the allergy sufferer away from the animal if given enough notice.
A Southwest Airlines told INSIDER: “If a customer states that their allergy can be life threatening, we require a medical certificate from the customer’s physician that is dated within ten days of the scheduled date of the customer’s initial departing flight.
However, in regards to service animals documentation is not required for trained service animals, unless on international flights.

Watch: Woman dragged off plane after complaining of dog allergies

Watch: Woman dragged off plane after complaining of dog allergies

Screaming “don’t touch me, don’t touch me…you ripped by pants!”, a female passenger made a defiant stand against police officers who physically dragged her off a Southwest Airlines flight after she complained of life-threatening dog allergies.
The woman who claims to be a professor was forcibly removed from the flight after she claimed to airline staff to have a life-threatening pet allergy but refused to leave the plane, causing a flight delay.
“I’m sorry, my dad has a surgery! What are you doing?” she screamed at airport security. To which one security officer said: “Lady, let’s go,” while another officer grabbed her.
The Youtube video, which has clocked half a million hits, states that the woman had notified Southwest staff of her allergy after seeing two dogs — one a pet and the other a service animal — on the flight with her.
The clip was posted to Youtube on Wednesday.
The Southwest flight was due to fly from Baltimore to Los Angeles. After the woman refused the crew’s request to leave the plane, police were called to intervene.

Traumatic experiences may raise women’s heart disease risk

Traumatic experiences may raise women’s heart disease risk

Experiencing a high number of traumatic events could increase a woman’s risk of developing heart disease, especially after menopause, a new study suggests.
Endothelial function refers to how well the endothelium – or the layer of epithelial cells that lines the interior of the heart and blood vessels – helps to regulate the constriction and relaxation of blood vessels.
Endothelial dysfunction is a considered a risk factor for heart disease.
The new study – led by researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine in Pennsylvania – suggests that traumatic experiences could increase the risk of endothelial dysfunction in women, particularly for those who are postmenopausal.
None of the women smoked.
Each woman reported how many traumatic events they had experienced during their lifetime.
The team found that women who reported experiencing at least three traumatic events in their lifetime had poorer endothelial function than those who had fewer traumatic experiences, suggesting that they may be at greater risk of heart disease.
According to Dr. Thurston, the team’s findings “underscore the importance of psychosocial factors, such as trauma exposure, in the development of heart disease risk in midlife women.”
Dr. JoAnn Pinkerton, executive director of the NAMS, believes that physicians should take these study findings into account when assessing women’s risk of heart disease.